Monthly Archives: April 2015

British Romanticism vs. German Romanticism

While our class is concerned primarily with British Romantic writers, I think it is important to note that the British conception of Romanticism is not the only conception of this movement, and there are, in fact, some big differences between … Continue reading

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Anna Laetitia Barbauld

“A Summer Evening’s Meditation:” A Precursor to the Structure of the Greater Romantic Lyric Anna Laetitia Barbauld was born in YEAR to dissenting schoolmasters. Her parents were Protestants dissenting from the Anglican Church and its rituals. Barbauld herself was against organized … Continue reading

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Washing Day by Anna Laetitia Barbauld

Anna Laetitita Barbauld by John Chapman (1798) In “Washing Day”, Anna Laetitia Barbauld writes of an everyday life event, but she elevates  it to a challenge of epic proportions. She views the experience of a washing day from two different … Continue reading

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Wordsworth & Coleridge: Meter and Language in Lyrical Ballads

After first reading Lyrical Ballads, I wanted to have a better understanding of the collaborative relationship between William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge so as to better understand Lyrical Ballads and its creators. My research led me down an interesting path. I began … Continue reading

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William Jones and Principles of Romanticism

In his essay, “On the Poetry of Eastern Nations,” William Jones outlines several of the basic characteristics that came to be associated with the Romantics in the 18th century. In his discussion of the poetry produced by Eastern peoples, he … Continue reading

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“The Tyger” and “The Lamb”

With his poems “The Tyger,” from Songs of Experience, and “The Lamb,” from Songs of Innocence, William Blake provides two contrary views of creation. Both poems ponder the creation of their subject and offer different perspectives of the nature of creation and … Continue reading

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Wordsworth’s “Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey”

Like Samuel Taylor Coleridge in “Eolian Harp” and Percy Bysshe Shelley in “Hymn to Intellectual Beauty” and “Mont Blanc,” William Wordsworth explores ideas of a universal spirit that connects humanity to the natural world. The source for this spirit, however deviates … Continue reading

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