Category Archives: Maya MacKenzie

Charlotte Smith – “Beachy Head”

In her poem “Beachy Head,” Charlotte Smith uses the chalk headland Beachy Head as the setting to contemplate history, political power, and nature. Like her Elegiac Sonnets, “Beachy Head” includes Smith’s attentiveness to details of her landscape; Smith’s descriptions of the … Continue reading

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Sir William Jones’s and the Romantic Imagination

Sir William Jones’s, though not a Romantic poet himself, discussed some of, what would later be, the defining characteristics of Romanticism in “On the Poetry of Eastern Nations” and “On the arts, commonly considered imitative.” One of the most defining Romantic … Continue reading

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“The Eve of St. Agnes” and “Christabel”

John Keats’s “The Eve of St. Agnes,” published four years after Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “Christabel,” seems to have drawn inspiration from Coleridge’s poem as the two share rather similar opening scenes. Both of these poems open on bleak castle scenes … Continue reading

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Abolition and the Empire in Romantic Poetry

Much of the early Romantic poetry sought to promote abolition of the slave trade; authors of such poetry include Anna Laetitia Barbauld, William Cowper, and Hannah More. While the abolitionist poetry all exhibits attitudes vehemently against the slave trade, these … Continue reading

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“The Tyger” and “The Lamb”

With his poems “The Tyger,” from Songs of Experience, and “The Lamb,” from Songs of Innocence, William Blake provides two contrary views of creation. Both poems ponder the creation of their subject and offer different perspectives of the nature of creation and … Continue reading

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Wordsworth’s “Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey”

Like Samuel Taylor Coleridge in “Eolian Harp” and Percy Bysshe Shelley in “Hymn to Intellectual Beauty” and “Mont Blanc,” William Wordsworth explores ideas of a universal spirit that connects humanity to the natural world. The source for this spirit, however deviates … Continue reading

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Pantheism and the Aeolian Harp in “Eolian Harp” and “Mont Blanc”

Samuel Taylor Coleridge in “Eolian Harp” and Percy Bysshe Shelley in “Mont Blanc” both express pantheistic views, of a connecting spiritual thread that runs through humans and through nature. Yet, these poets reach two different conclusions upon their poems’ ends. … Continue reading

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